The-Shift-Shapers-Podcast-(Rough-Comp-2)

David Weingard is an entrepreneur who used his personal experience with diabetes to create Fit4D, a company that helps with both the personal and financial costs of this widespread and growing disease. David believes that even with all of the work that has been done, there is a huge opportunity for improvement.

In the past, addressing this problem has been more art than science. David believes that created a challenge to delivering measurable outcomes – which is precisely the metric plans need. But he is committed to changing that.

What You’ll Learn From this Episode:

  • How large is this population?
  • What are the four biggest diabetes management challenges facing plans?
  • What are some of the new programs, and what differentiates them?
  • What challenges exist for payers to deliver high value, high touch clinical support?
  • Where do we go from here and what does the future look like?

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ShiftShapersCoverArtCommunication is a critical component of personal and corporate success. We may think of conversation and communication as an art, but it turns out that the keys to effective communication are firmly rooted in science.

On this episode of ShiftShapers we explore those connections with Rachael Bosch, Managing Director of Fringe Professional Development, a Washington D.C. firm that helps organizations, teams, and individuals reach their professional learning goals.

We spend the majority of our time in school on the core business skills needed to do our job. However, the soft skills – or professional skills – that help you develop and lead teams don’t receive as much attention.

When communicating with your team it’s important to think not only about the message you need to convey but also how that message will be received. Rachael provides helpful clues into how we can communicate more effectively based on research by top neuroscientists.

From Baby Boomers to Millennials, each birth cohort approaches career aspirations in a unique manner. Learning how to communicate generously and build community will positively impact an environment where the organization’s employees can remain engaged.

What You’ll Learn From this Episode:

  • Why professional skills are just as important as the core business skills.
  • The component of professional skills has the most room for improvement.
  • How different generations learn and approach professional skills in the workplace.
  • Why it is important to learn how Millennials use their drive and professional skills.
  • Four filters that can boost effective communication results.

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ShiftShapersCoverArtAfter a market contraction due to a low interest rate environment and its effects on reserves as well as challenges understanding the pricing on a relatively new product, Long Term Care is poised for a comeback.

In part two of two, Bill Dyess and I continue our conversation about the future of Long Term Care insurance. Bill is the President of Dyess Insurance Services and one of the country’s foremost experts on long-term care.

Bill and I talk about how hybrid policies, which combine life insurance or annuities with Long Term Care insurance, have added a new wrinkle to the insurance marketplace. We measure some of the pros and cons of hybrid plans and highlight the importance of the advisor’s role as consumer educator.

The caregiver side of the equation is also important to weigh in the discussion of Long Term Care insurance. LTC can be a useful tool for caregivers, who must care for their own lives as well as those of their loved ones. As the nature of caregiving changes – trending younger and toward parity in caregivers’ gender – it is even more likely that LTC insurance will become more popular.

What You’ll Learn From this Episode:

  • The likelihood of an illness or accident triggering a Long Term Care claim.
  • How hybrid policies and plans are designed, and how they may affect the resurgence of LTC.
  • The role of partnership plans in protecting the consumer’s assets in the marketplace.
  • The changing nature of caregivers, and why LTC insurance is a tool they can utilize to ensure their loved ones get the care they need.
  • How to get into the Long Term Care space as an advisor.

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ShiftShapersCoverArtAfter a market contraction due to a low interest rate environment and its effects on reserves as well as challenges understanding the pricing on a relatively new product, Long Term Care is poised for a comeback.

On this first of a two-part series on the ShiftShapers Podcast, we’ll investigate a resurging need for long-term care insurance. There is a 75% chance that those who reach the age of 65 will need long-term care at some point in their lives. Our guest, Bill Dyess, is President of Dyess Insurance Services. He is one of the country’s foremost experts on long-term care.

Getting hurt or becoming sick and needing long-term care as a result of a chronic condition can happen at any age. While long-term care is primarily associated with the needs of an aging population, though anyone at any age can face this challenge. Bill will help explain the differences and the need for disability vs. long-term insurance.

In the 1980s and 1990s, there was an explosion of long-term care products. As the costs associated with long-term care exploded, the availability of products disappeared. The population is aging and surviving previously fatal diseases at a higher rate which makes an interest in long-term care insurance a new opportunity. There is a resurgence in the number of carriers in the marketplace and today we discuss what this means for advisors.

What You’ll Learn From this Episode:

  • A history of the long-term care product and why there is a resurgence of product offerings in the marketplace.
  • Typical costs associated with various categories of long-term care assistance.
  • Strategies for minimizing the costs of premiums and what effect that has on out of pocket expenses.

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ShiftShapersCoverArtAccording to the CDC, over 29 million people in the US are diabetic. It costs more than $176 billion to treat diabetes – so how can employers and employees manage the treatment and complications of this lifelong disease?

Today Tom Milam of TrueLifeCare talks about just how big the diabetes problem has become in the workforce. He distinguishes between the two components contributing to the scope of the problem, which is affecting employees across age cohorts: costs associated with diagnosing and maintaining diabetes, and those associated with its complications. Tom also shares some staggering figures about how much employers pay for employees with diabetes compared to those without.

We then cover how advisors can find data about their clients’ employees to understand how diabetes is affecting their workforce. Tom talks about some of the tools advisors are using to discuss diabetes management with employers and strategies to minimize the disease’s costs. He also shares some research from the Northeast Business Group on Health describing why previous attempts to curb diabetes costs in employees haven’t been successful, and how to change tactics going forward.

Tom shares how much of a struggle it can be to keep employees engaged with the daily choices they must make to keep diabetes in check. While there is no single solution, incentives and other tools can help employers keep their employees healthy and save money for them both.

What You’ll Learn From this Episode:

  • How large the problem of diabetes has become in employee populations.
  • Why it’s important to consider complications of diabetes when calculating healthcare costs, not merely diagnosis and maintenance.
  • How much diabetes currently costs employers and employees, compared to average employee costs.
  • How advisors should discuss these challenges and potential solutions with prospects and clients.
  • Why it can be tricky to get employees engaged in counteracting diabetes.
  • The shift from tell-oriented to help-oriented disease management programs and their effect on employees with diabetes.

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